Handy Treads Rough Road to Success.

The year was 2012 and former Harvard students-turned-partners Oisin Hanrahan and Umanga Dua were on the verge of launching their company: Handybook (soon to become just ‘Handy’). The purpose of Handy had been concocted by the Hanrahan and Dua when they were roommates while attending Harvard Business School. They wanted to create a ‘freelancer for hire’ program that was intuitive, effective, and accessible. Needless to say, the program took off and soon the duo was looking at a hot start in a very crowded tech world. So why would they try and change their formula? As it turns out, Handy was on the verge of an evolution — not a devaluation.

The biggest problem that many people had with the original iteration of Handy.com was that there seemed to be a low threshold for Freelancers. Since 2014 Hanrahan had been pitching the idea of a more advanced, thorough form of freelancer screening. Dua had been hesitant because he figured that advanced screening would be hard to implement. Still, Hanrahan won out and the process was implemented in early 2016. Things were rocky at the start but after a few months of stress it seemed like the roll out was complete and effective — in all 28 of Handy’s markets.

With Handy’s rapid success it became a sudden point of focus that customer service, https://www.handy.com/services) would need to increase. Hanrahan and Dua got creative with their staffing, funding call centers in tax friendly places like Florida, before they began to see some real positive changes. Dua and Hanrahan also worked hard in order to create a fluid website experience that helped customers handle their issues on their own. Hanrahan and Dua have been able to reduce and minimize their overhead while maximizing what they can offer customers in all of their 28 markets.